• Business

    Amazing Student Invention Ideas Actualized in the Past

    Several schools, institutions and companies give opportunities to students to showcase their creativity and resourcefulness by making their own inventions. They do this in the form of invention exhibits, competitions and grants.

    With these events, countless student invention ideas have been actualized in the past. Some of them are too useful and practical that they have been mass-produced by companies to make them readily available to the public as written onĀ http://theavtimes.com/2020/07/01/amazing-ways-inventhelp-can-assist-you-as-an-inventor/ post.

    Here are examples of student invention ideas that have been actualized in the past:

    Safe stepper

    This device was created by Dorothy Weiss when she was still 12 years of age. Her grandmother’s hip fracture then inspired her to produce this invention. After the hip fracture, the doctor told Dorothy’s grandmother that too much stress and weight must not be applied on her hip.

    Because of this, Dorothy created a device that can be installed as an inner sole of her grandmother’s shoe. This device has a built-in alarm system that warns the user if the weight placed on it exceeds the weight that the doctor has prescribed.

    American sign language translator

    This is one of the student invention ideas that have earned multiple distinctions. It breaks the communication barrier between speech-challenged people and those that can speak yet cannot understand sign language. This invention comes in the form of a golf glove that translates American sign language to words.

    Translations are displayed on a small screen. Ryan Patterson was only 19 when he designed this special translator. He won in several events for this invention including the Siemens Westinghouse Science and Technology Competition and the Intel International Science & Engineering Fair.

    Auto-off candle

    Lisa Marie Wright was only 15 years old when she invented the auto-off candle. It works through the use of a metal band system that automatically cuts the burn time of candles after a particular shut-off time is preset. The system does this by stopping the supply of fuel provided to the flame. Find more information about patents and inventions fromĀ https://www.newsbreak.com/news/1606220763464/how-new-inventors-are-benefitting-from-inventhelp-assistance.

  • Health and Beauty

    Gums Basics

    Gums make gels like gelatin (which is derived mostly from pork and beef hides), and gums help to prevent ice crystals in ice cream and frozen foods. They also help retain moisture in foods so that they stay fresher longer.

    You will find gums in cream cheese to help control what we in the industry call syneresis. That’s what people outside the industry call “the cheese is leaking water all over the bagel”. There are hundreds of more uses for gums. For example, they help make instant products instant, help cigar wrappers stay wrapped, keep the herbs and spices nicely suspended in your salad dressings, and much much more.

    Some non-food industry uses include:

    • Paper sizing
    • Art work (marbleizing paper and gloss on paper works)
    • Oil well drilling
    • Cosmetic bases
    • Mummification (not a great source of income for us any longer)

    Gums are called hydrocolloids. Just a fancy name for stuff that is soluble in water. Chewing gum (chicle), by the way, is not a gum, it is a resin. It is insoluble in water, that’s why it doesn’t melt in your mouth.

    • Hydro = Water
    • Colloid = Dispersion of small particles in another medium

    They are too small to be seen under an ordinary microscope and are too large to pass through a semi permeable membrane.

    Where do they come from?

    Geographically speaking, gums come from all over the world from the land and the sea. There are five primary sources of gums:

    Seed Gums

    Names like guar gum, locust (carob) bean gum and other lesser known gums. These gums are similar to wheat in that they are the center (endosperm) of a seed. Locust bean gum, despite its name, does not come from insects but rather from the seed of the carob pod. Many people know carob as the natural health food store substitute for chocolate. The outside shell is made into carob powder and the inside of the seed becomes locust bean gum. Guar, unlike flour or corn starch, does not need to be heated to get thick, a big advantage in processing some foods.

    Tree Exudates

    Exudates is a fancy name for sap, like maple syrup. The difference between maple syrup and gums like gum arabic (acacia gum), karaya (that’s the stuff that holds your dentures in, by the way), gum ghatti and gum tragacanth is that these saps harden as they ooze from the tree. The hardened sap is picked off the tree and ground down to a fine flour. Each has its own unique attributes. Gum arabic is used extensively in flavor emulsions … most every soda you drink started off with an oil emulsion that has gum arabic in it.

    Marine Gums

    Seaweed, the same stuff they wrap sushi in. You’ll see names like carrageenan, alginate, and agar-agar (sometimes called agar by those trying to be overly familiar with the weed). Some of the marine gums form gels, such as gellan gum. Agar is the stuff you put in petri dishes to grow mold in science class. Get some seaweed next time you’re at the beach, boil it and dry the stuff that comes to the top. Grind it and it is a carrageenan, alginate, etc. depending on the plant with which you started.

    Microbial Fermentation

    This may sound a little like laboratory grown, but then what is wine, vinegar, yogurt, Swiss cheese, champagne or brie? They are essentially foods modified by microbes. Xanthan gum for example (pronounced zanthan) is manufactured using a natural (microbial) fermentation process which converts corn syrup to Xanthan Gum using the microorganisim Xanthomonas campestris. This microbe (commonly found on green leaves such as cabbage) produces the Xanthan Gum as a protective coating. Xanthan Gum is used extensively in salad dressings and many other products.